google-site-verification=Gn8dl4Dwf7-p4jOrfYxzN16bTDme36rV9i-UkKSIS3I
top of page

Product/Services Overview:

INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENT PLANNER: Smart City & Initiative Infrastructure Investment Plan as the part of SDP’s Management Consulting & Government Advisory service offering for Public, Private and Social sector clients.

 

Product/ Service Delivery Duration:

Min 2-3 months depending upon Size of offering required and Scope of Work.

 

Ideal Client Type:

Public, Private and Social sector clients: International Agencies, National Governments-Ministries; Local Governments-Municipalities, Development Authorities, Smart City SPVs/ offices, Private Companies.

 

What is in the package of Product/Services (Deliverables)?

  • Smart Infrastructures Investment Plan report
  • Support for Smart Infrastructures Investment Plan Stakeholder Management.

 

Product Offering/SoW Overview:

  • Identifying and mapping out the current processes-Start by defining the business process ‘as is’: list of roles, list of steps, handoff points, exceptions- Use case diagram & core business processes.

  • Analyzing the key indicators including the Stakeholders consultation-the steps in the process, problems related to the step, the type of problem, the impact of the problem, the system requirements.

  • Mapping out the new plan and objectives- the improvement plan.

  • Finding out how technology fits into the new plan-Customer relationship management (CRM) and a file sharing and project management system.

  • Building an overview of the process flow

  • Creating the process flow detail

  • Writing the operating procedure

  • Developing a detailed work instruction with the proposed interventions.

  • Diagnosis and Recommendations for improvement.

  • Having a Plan for Continuous Process Improvement.

  • Set out the business case for digital investment in infrastructure

  • Develop a common language so information can be shared

  • Establish quality data and asset information

  • Address leadership and governance issues

  • A detailed assessment is needed by industry and the government of the opportunities, impacts, challenges and process of implementing Smart Infrastructure in the following areas: Policy and government, Clients and markets, Society and citizens & Technology

 

Key Benefits:

  • Smart Infrastructure will allow owners and operators to get more out of what they already have – increasing capacity, efficiency, reliability and resilience.

  • Getting more from existing assets will enable owners and operators to enhance service provision despite constrained finance, growing resource scarcity and, in mature economies, short supply of green field space.

  • Better understanding of the performance of our infrastructure will allow new infrastructure to be designed and delivered more efficiently, and to provide better whole-life value.

  • More intelligent operation of mature networks

  • Longer life and more efficient operation for new infrastructure.

  • Better whole-life value

  • Improving intelligence Providing better information to the users and operators

  • Improving decisions Enabling ‘better decisions, faster and cheaper’ Using Smart Infrastructure to realise new value from existing assets Value is created in a number of ways:

    - Infrastructure value It is more cost-effective to add to the overall value of mature infrastructure via digital enhancements than by physical enhancements.

    - Customer value Better value for money, measured in terms of improved customer service/experience. Information value Information itself has value, and loss of information represents a loss of value.

    - Information value is created by increasing connectivity (the network effect) and increasing integration (reducing information loss at interfaces).

    - Integration value is enhanced through integration and data sharing across: The infrastructure process (use, operation, maintenance, investment planning, feasibility, design, manufacture, logistics, assembly).  The value chain (clients, asset managers, operators, contractors, consultants, suppliers, manufacturers). Sectors (communications, energy, transport, waste and water, but also health, education, policy).

 

Additional Free Offerings:

BenFrealize

INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENT PLANNER

$0.00Price
    • Insufficient funds

    • Lack of experienced professionals

    • Inconsistent network connectivity

    • The regulatory and legal conditions that currently hinder the municipal borrowing, needs to be altered to encourage appropriate expansion of the scope of bond financing.

    • To gain investor confidence, municipalities need to obtain credit rating for raising funds from the market.

    • Ring-fencing the municipal bond funds is very essential by clearly earmarking the same for a defined project and is thus, insulated from interventions.

    • Change in perception. Very often the urban local bodies are still considered to be riskier than the corporates with similar rating largely because the risk perception is significantly linked to financial position of their states as they depend significantly upon the devolution of resources and grant from the state government. Therefore, the outlook for ULBs would depend upon the outlook on the financial position of the state concerned.

    • Ring-fencing the municipal bond funds is very essential by clearly earmarking the same for a defined project and is thus, insulated from interventions.

    • There is need for improving transparency in accounting and budgeting and disclosure of all the material facts regarding the management, administration, financials, operations, projects, revenue generation, risk factors, etc. Timely audit, putting in place a framework for legal remedy against defaulting ULBs and assurance against diversion of fund will have to be addressed.

    • Pooled finance mechanism: This was initiated for small and medium sized ULBs to hedge risk for the investors and thereby avoid huge transaction costs.

bottom of page